C Interview Questions
Questions Answers Views Company eMail

#define f(g,h) g##h main O int i=0 int var=100 ; print f ("%d"f(var,10));} what would be the output?

Wipro,

1 3564

Write a C++ program without using any loop (if, for, while etc) to print prime numbers from 1 to 100 and 100 to 1 (Do not use 200 print statements!!!)

HCL, Cap Gemini,

2 4802

why do we use # in c-language?

1 2394




what is the difference between class and unio?

HCL, Wipro,

1180

int main() { int i=-1,j=-1;k=0,l=2,m; m=i++&&j++&&k++||l++; printf("%d%d%d%d%d",i,j,k,l,m); }

HCL,

3 4993

To print the pattern 1 2 3 4 5 10 17 18 19 6 15 24 25 20 7 14 23 22 21 8 13 12 11 10 9

HCL,

1467

for(;;) printf("C language") What is out put of above??

Practical Viva Questions,

2 1929

Heyyy All, Just a challenge . A C program with if Else if(){ /// insert sumthing print ("in if") // insert sumting } else { ///// insert sumthing print ("in else"); //// insert sumthing } can anyone modify it so that program prints. if and else both

3 1908




#include #include struct stu { int i; char j; }; union uni { int i; char j; }; void main() { int j,k; clrscr(); struct stu s; j=sizeof(s); printf("%d",j); union uni u; k=sizeof(u); printf("%d",k); getch(); } what is value of j and k.

Facebook,

2 2717

output for following code??? main() { int x=2,y,z; x*=3+2; printf("1.%d\n",x); x*=y=z=4; printf("2.%d %d %d\n",x,y,z); x=y==z; printf("3.%d\n",x); x==(y=z); printf("%d",x); }

Elysium,

2 1601

Write a c program for sum of first n terms of the series S = 1 - (1/3) + (1/5) -(1/7) + (1/9) ......

2 2309

Sir i need notes for structure,functions,pointers in c language can you help me please

TCS,

1310

How we can set and clear bit in a byte using macro function?

L&T, Samsung,

2 14895

How we can write a value to an address using macro..?

Tata Elxsi,

2163

#define FALSE -1 #define TRUE 1 #define NULL 0 main() { if(NULL) puts("NULL"); else if(FALSE) puts("TRUE"); else puts("FALSE"); }

1 3109


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Un-Answered Questions { C }

In cryptography, you could often break the algorithm if you know what was the original (plain) text that was encoded into the current ciphertext. This is called the plain text attack. In this simple problem, we illustrate the plain text attack on a simple substitution cipher encryption, where you know each letter has been substituted with a different letter from the alphabet but you don’t know what that letter is. You are given the cipherText as the input string to the function getwordSets(). You know that a plain text "AMMUNITION" occurs somewhere in this cipher text. Now, you have to find out which sets of characters corresponds to the encrypted form of the "AMMUNITION". You can assume that the encryption follows simple substitution only. [Hint: You could use the pattern in the "AMMUNITION" like MM occurring twice together to identify this]

1254


If one always ought to act so as to produce the best possible circumstances, then morality is extremely demanding. No one could plausibly claim to have met the requirements of this "simple principle." . . . It would seem strange to punish those intending to do good by sentencing them to an impossible task. Also, if the standards of right conduct are as extreme as they seem, then they will preclude the personal projects that humans find most fulfilling. From an analytic perspective, the potential extreme demands of morality are not a "problem." A theory of morality is no less valid simply because it asks great sacrifices. In fact, it is difficult to imagine what kind of constraints could be put on our ethical projects. Shouldn't we reflect on our base prejudices, and not allow them to provide boundaries for our moral reasoning? Thus, it is tempting to simply dismiss the objections to the simple principle. However, in Demands of Morality, Liam Murphy takes these objections seriously for at least two distinct reasons. First, discussion of the simple principle provides an excellent vehicle for a discussion of morality in general. Perhaps, in a way, this is Murphy's attempt at doing philosophy "from the inside out.". . . Second, Murphy's starting point tells us about the nature of his project. Murphy must take seriously the collisions between moral philosophy and our intuitive sense of right and wrong. He [must do so] because his work is best interpreted as intended to forge moral principles from our firm beliefs, and not to proscribe beliefs given a set of moral principles. [Murphy] argues from our considered judgments rather than to them. . . For example, Murphy cites our "simple but firmly held" beliefs as supporting the potency of the over-demandingness objection, and nowhere in the work can one find a source of moral values divorced from human preferences. Murphy does not tell us what set of "firm beliefs" we ought to have. Rather, he speaks to an audience of well-intentioned but unorganized moral realists, and tries to give them principles that represent their considered moral judgments. Murphy starts with this base sense of right and wrong, but recognizes that it needs to be supplemented by reason where our intuitions are confused or conflicting. Perhaps Murphy is looking for the best interpretation of our convictions, the same way certain legal scholars try to find the best interpretation of our Constitution. This approach has disadvantages. Primarily, Murphy's arguments, even if successful, do not provide the kind of motivating force for which moral philosophy has traditionally searched. His work assumes and argues in terms of an inner sense of morality, and his project seeks to deepen that sense. Of course, it is quite possible that the moral viewpoints of humans will not converge, and some humans have no moral sense at all. Thus, it is very easy for the moral skeptic to point out a lack of justification and ignore the entire work. On the other hand, Murphy's choice of a starting point avoids many of the problems of moral philosophy. Justifying the content of moral principles and granting a motivating force to those principles is an extraordinary task. It would be unrealistic to expect all discussions of moral philosophy to derive such justifications. Projects that attempt such a derivation have value, but they are hard pressed to produce logical consequences for everyday life. In the end, Murphy's strategy may have more practical effect than its first-principle counterparts, which do not seem any more likely to convince those that would reject Murphy's premises. 1) The author suggests that the application of Murphy's philosophy to the situations of two different groups: a) would help to solve the problems of one group but not of the other. b) could result in the derivation of two radically different moral principles. c) would be contingent on the two groups sharing the same fundamental beliefs. d) could reconcile any differences between the two groups. 2) Suppose an individual who firmly believes in keeping promises has promised to return a weapon to a person she knows to be extremely dangerous. According to Murphy, which of the following, if true, would WEAKEN the notion that she should return the weapon? a) She also firmly believes that it is morally wrong to assist in any way in a potentially violent act. b) She believes herself to be well-intentioned in matters of right and wrong. c) The belief that one should keep promises is shared by most members of her community. d) She derived her moral beliefs from first-principle ethical philosophy. 3) The passage implies that a moral principle derived from applying Murphy's philosophy to a particular group would be applicable to another group if: a) the first group recommended the principle to the second group. b) the moral viewpoints of the two groups do not converge. c) the members of the second group have no firmly held beliefs. d) the second group shares the same fundamental beliefs as the first group. 4) According to the passage, the existence of individuals who entirely lack a moral sense: a) confirms the notion that moral principles should be derived from the considered judgments of individuals. b) suggests a potential disadvantage of Murphy's philosophical approach. c) supports Murphy's belief that reason is necessary in cases in which intuitions are conflicting or confused. d) proves that first-principle strategies of ethical theorizing will have no more influence over the behavior of individuals than will Murphy's philosophical approach. 5) Which of the following can be inferred about "doing philosophy from the inside out?" a) Murphy was the first philosopher to employ such an approach. b) It allows no place for rational argument in the formation of ethical principles. c) It is fundamentally different from the practice of first-principle philosophy. d) It is designed to dismiss objections to the "simple principle." 6) A school board is debating whether or not to institute a dress code for the school's students. According to Murphy, the best way to come to an ethical decision would be to: a) consult the fundamental beliefs of the board members. b) analyze the results of dress codes instituted at other schools. c) survey the students as to whether or not they would prefer a dress code. d) determine whether or note a dress code has ever been instituted in the school's history

1162


A float occupies 4 bytes in memory. How many bits are used to store exponent part? since we can have up to 38 number for exponent so 2 ki power 6 6, 6 bits will be used. If 6 bits are used why do not we have up to 64 numbers in exponent?

1086


Draw a diagram showing how the operating system relates to users, application programs, and the computer hardware ?

1378


write a program to find the given number is prime or not

2470






write a program for the normal snake games find in most of the mobiles.

1204


all c language question

1099


int i=10; printf("%d %d %d", i, i=20, i);

291


what are # pragma staments?

896


write a program to print data of 5 five students with structures?

948


write a C program:There is a mobile keypad with numbers 0-9 and alphabets on it. Take input 0f 7 keys and then form a word from the alphabets present on the keys.

11047


Write a C program to count the number of email on text

836


I need help with the following lab. Can anyone explain it to me on how to approach this problem. Coding would be great too !!! No busy waiting allowed. Remember that Java monitors are 'signal and continue'. The input data is called the database (DB). In this problem, it consists of a single variable initialized in the main thread, to contain the current time of day in HH:MM:SS:mmm format (mmm is milliseconds) truncated to 3 digits. Threads follow these rules: 1. Readers may all attempt to read at the same time, but NOT if a writer is writing (i.e.; the writer is in the monitor. 2. Writing is exclusive (only 1 writer at a time, no readers while writing). 3. Options: (to be specified by instructor) a. Readers have absolute priority over writers. b. Writers have absolute priority over readers c. When a reader arrives and a writer is waiting, the reader is suspended behind the writer instead of being admitted immediately. Thus, a writer waits for readers that were running when it arrived, but does not to wait for new readers. You may program this in C++ or Java. There are 4 controlling input values: 1. r – number of readers 2. w – number of writers 3. R – delay for a reader to restart 4. W – delay for a writer to restart Create the following program consisting of 1 main process (your main program) with n threads: 1. The main thread: a. Creates the 'n' threads needed. Of these, r of them are readers and w of them are writers. Starts all readers and writers. b. Waits for all 'n' threads to complete. You may use any method to detect when they are all complete. c. Prints out the resulting outputs from the threads. 2. Threads: a. When a thread starts to run, it immediately tries to enter the monitor. b. A reader thread reads the DB, outputs the exact message below, then exits: >>> DB value read =: HH:MM:SS:mmm by reader number: rr where the underlined text is replaced with actual data. c. A writer thread updates the DB with a new value (from the system time), outputs the exact message below, then exits: *** DB value set to: HH:MM:SS:mmm by writer number: ww where the underlined text is replaced with actual data. d. Each thread accesses the data a total of 10 times, exiting, then re-entering the monitor after each access. Hints: 1. File access *might* not be thread-safe, so you should be prepared to handle this. Read the documentation for the language you are using. 2. Suggested values for delays are: a. If looping, R >=1,000,000 and W>=100,000 b. If using “sleep”, then R=100 ms, W=50 ms. Additional: • Thread output is to ONE file used by ALL threads (so you need to synchronize access to it). • Readers must provide sufficient delay that results are useful (delay by R before re-trying). R is another input value. • Writers must also delay. Delay by W, updating the DB each time. W is an input. • Test your program with AT LEAST TWO different sets of values for r and w (#s of readers and writers) plus this set: r = 4, w=2. Basic operation of a thread: attempt to enter the monitor. If unsuccessful, you get put on a queue. When you get in, read or write the data (depending on type of thread), exit the monitor, wait the required delay amount, then try again. Repeat 10 times.

820


Hai what is the different types of versions and their differences

854


What is the difference between test design and test case design?

906