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Question
SSC ? Grade ?D? Exam
ENGLISH
COMPREHENSION
 Question Submitted By :: English
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Answer
# 1
SSC ? Grade ?D? Exam
ENGLISH
COMPREHENSION

PASSAGE ? 1
I felt the wall of the tunnel shiver. The master alarm
squealed through my earphones. Almost simultaneously, Jack
yelled down to me that there was a warning light on ??
Fleeting but spectacular sights snapped into and out of
view, the snow, the shower of debris, the moon, looming
close and big, the dazzling sunshine for once unfiltered by
layers of air. The last twelve hours before re-entry were
particularly bone-chilling. During this period, I had to
go up into the command module. Even after the fiery re-
entry and splashing down in 810 water in the south Pacific,
we could still see our frosty breath inside the command
module.
1. Which one of the following reasons would one
consider as more possible for the warning lights to be on?
(a) There was a shower of debris.
(b) Jack was yelling.
(c) A catastrophe was imminent.
(d) The moon was looming close and big.
Ans: ( c ) A catastrophe was imminent.

2. The statement that the dazzling sunshine was ?for
once unfiltered by layers of air? means
(a) that the sun was very hot.
(b) that there was no strong wind.
(c) that the air was unpolluted.
(d) none of the above.
Ans: ( d ) none of the above.

3. The word ?Command Module? used twice in the given
passage indicates perhaps that it deals with
(a) an alarming journey.
(b) a commanding situation.
(c) a journey into outer space.
(d) a frightful battle.
Ans: ( c ) a journey into outer space.

PASSAGE ? 2
But I did not want to shoot the elephant. I watched him
beating his bunch of grass against his knees, with the
preoccupied grandmotherly air that elephants have. It
seemed to me that it would be murder to shoot him. I had
never shot an elephant and never wanted to. (Somehow it
always seems worse to kill a large animal.) Besides,
there was the beast?s owner to be considered. But I had
got to act quickly. I turned to some experienced-looking
Burmans who had been there when we arrived, and asked them
how the elephant had been behaving. They all said the
same thing: he took no notice of you if you left him alone,
but he might charge if you went too close to him.
1. The phrase ? preoccupied grandmotherly air?
signifies
(a) being totally unconcerned.
(b) pretending to be very busy.
(c) a very superior attitude.
(d) calm, dignified and affectionate
disposition.
Ans: ( d ) calm, dignified and affectionate
disposition.

2. From the passage it appears that the author was
(a) an inexperienced hunter.
(b) kind and considerate.
(c) possessed with fear.
(d) a worried man.
Ans: ( b ) kind and considerate.

3. The author did not want to shoot the elephant
because he
(a) was afraid of it.
(b) did not have the experience of shooting big
animals.
(c) did not wish to kill animal which was not
doing anybody any harm.
(d) did not find the elephant to be ferocious.
Ans: ( b ) did not have the experience of
shooting big animals.

PASSAGE ? 3
Harold, a professional man who had worked in an office for
many years, had a fearful dream. In it, he found himself
in a land where small slug-like animals with slimy
tentacles lived on people?s bodies. The people tolerated
the loathsome creatures because after many years they grew
into elephants which then became the nation?s system of
transport, carrying everyone wherever he wanted to go.
Harold suddenly realized that he himself was covered with
these things, and he woke up screaming. In a vivid
sequence of pictures this dream dramatized for Harold what
he had never been able to put into words; he saw himself as
letting society feed on his body in his early years so that
it would carry him when he retired. He later threw of
the ?security bug? and took up freelance work.
1. Which one of the following phrases best helps to
bring out the precise meaning of ?loathsome creatures??
(a) Security bug and slimy tentacles.
(b) Fearful dream and slug-like animals.
(c) Slimy tentacles and slug-like animals.
(d) Slug-like animals and security bug.
Ans: ( c ) Slimy tentacles and slug-like
animals.

2. Harold?s dream was fearful because
(a) it brought him face to face with reality.
(b) it was full of vivid pictures of snakes.
(c) he saw huge elephants in it.
(d) in it he saw slimy creatures feeding on
people?s bodies.
Ans: ( a ) it brought him face to face with
reality.

3. In his dream, Harold found the loathsome creatures
(a) in his village
(b) in his own house
(c) in a different land
(d) in his office
Ans: ( d ) in his office


4. The statement that ?he later threw off the security
bug? means that
(a) Harold succeeded in overcoming the need for
security
(b) Harold stopped giving much importance to
dreams
(c) Harold started tolerating social
victimization
(d) Harold killed all the bugs troubling him
Ans: ( a ) Harold succeeded in overcoming the
need for security

PASSAGE ? 4
Laws of nature are not commands but statements of acts.
The use of the word ?law? in this context is rather
unfortunate. It would be better to speak of uniformities
of nature. This would do away with the elementary fallacy
that a law implies a law-giver. If a piece of matter does
not obey a law of nature it is not punished. On the
contrary, we say that the law has been incorrectly started.
1. Laws of nature differ from man-made laws because
(a) the former state facts of Nature.
(b) they must be obeyed.
(c) they are natural.
(d) unlike human laws, they are systematic.
Ans: ( a ) the former state facts of Nature.

2. If a piece of matter violates nature?s law, it is
not punished because
(a) it is not binding to obey it.
(b) there is no superior being to enforce the
law of nature.
(c) it cannot be punished.
(d) it simply means that the facts have not
been correctly stated by the law
Ans: ( b ) there is no superior being to
enforce the law of nature.

3. The author is not happy with the word ?law? because
(a) it connotes rigidity and harshness.
(b) it implies an agency which has made them.
(c) it does not convey the sense of nature?s
uniformity.
(d) it gives rise to false beliefs.
Ans: ( a ) it connotes rigidity and harshness.


4. The laws of nature based on observation are
(a) conclusive about the nature of the universe.
(b) true and unfalsifiable
(c) figments of the observer?s imagination.
(d) subject to change in the light of new facts.
Ans: ( d ) subject to change in the light of
new facts.

PASSAGE ? 5
Male lions are rather reticent about expending their energy
in hunting?more than three-quarters of kills are made by
lionesses. Setting off at dusk on a hunt, the lionesses
are in front, tensely scanning ahead, the cubs lag
playfully behind and the males bring up the rear, walking
slowly, their massive heads nodding with each step as if
they were bored with the whole matter. But slothfulness
may have survival value. With lionesses busy hunting, the
males function as guards for the cubs, protecting them
particularly from hyenas.
1. According to the passage male lions generally do
not go for hunting because
(a) they do not like it.
(b) they want lioness to get training.
(c) they wish to save their vigour for others
things.
(d) they are very lazy.
Ans: ( c ) they wish to save their vigour for
others things.

2. Lionesses go for hunting
(a) All alone
(b) with their male partners only.
(c) with their cubs and male partners.
(d) with their cubs only.
Ans: ( c ) with their cubs and male partners.

3. When lionesses go in search for their prey, they
are very
(a) serious
(b) cautious
(c) playful
(d) sluggish
Ans: ( b ) cautious


4. Male lions protect their cubs
(a) from the members of their own species.
(b) from hyenas only.
(c) from hyenas as much as from other enemies.
(d) more from hyenas than from other animals.
Ans: ( d ) more from hyenas than from other
animals.

PASSAGE ? 6
At this stage of the civilization, when many nations are
brought into close and vital contact for good and evil, it
is essential, as never before, that their gross ignorance
of one another should be diminished, that they should begin
to understand a little of one another?s historical
experience and resulting mentality. It is a fault of the
English to expect the people of other countries to react as
they do, to political and international situations. Our
genuine goodwill and good intentions are often brought to
nothing, because we expect other people to be like us.
This would be corrected if we knew the history, not
necessarily in detail but in broad outlines, of the social
and political conditions which have given to each nation
its present character.
1. According to the author the ?mentality? of a nation
is mainly a product of its
(a) history
(b) international position
(c) politics
(d) present character
Ans: ( a ) history

2. Englishmen like others to react to political
situations like
(a) us.
(b) themselves.
(c) others.
(d) each other.
Ans: ( b ) themselves.

3. The character of a nation is the result of its
(a) mentality.
(b) cultural heritage.
(c) gross ignorance.
(d) socio-political conditions.
Ans: ( d ) socio-political conditions.

4. The need for a greater understanding between nations
(a) was always there.
(b) is no longer there.
(c) is more today then ever before.
(d) will always be there.
Ans: ( c ) is more today then ever before.

5. According to the author his countrymen should
(a) read the history of other nations.
(b) have a better understanding of other
nations.
(c) not react to other nations.
(d) have vital contacts with other nations.
Ans: ( b ) have a better understanding of
other nations.

PASSAGE ? 7
What needs to be set right is our approach to work. It is
a common sight in our country of employees reporting for
duty on time and at the same time doing little work. If an
assessment is made of the time they spent in gossiping,
drinking tea, eating ?pan? and smoking cigarettes, it will
be shocking to know that the time devoted to actual work is
negligible. The problem is the standard which the
leadership in administration sets for the staff. Forget
the ministers because they mix politics and
administration. What do top bureaucrats do? What do the
officials down below do? The administration set up remains
weak mainly because the employees do not have the right
example to follow and they are more concerned about being
in the good books of the bosses than doing work.
1. According to the writer, the administration in India
(a) is by and large effective.
(b) is very strict and firm.
(c) is affected by red tape.
(d) is more or less ineffective.
Ans: ( d ) is more or less ineffective.

2. The central idea of the passage could be best
expressed by the following
(a) The employees outlook towards work is
justified.
(b) The employees must change their outlook
towards work.
(c) The employees would never change their work
culture.
(d) The employer-employee relationship is far
from healthy.
Ans: ( b ) The employees must change their
outlook towards work.

3. The employees in our country
(a) are quite punctual but not duty conscious.
(b) are not punctual, but somehow manage to
complete their work.
(c) are somewhat lazy but good-natured.
(d) are not very highly qualified.
Ans: ( a ) are quite punctual but not duty
conscious.

4. The leadership in administration
(a) sets a fine example to the employees.
(b) is of a reasonably high standard.
(c) is composed of idealists.
(d) is of a very poor standard.
Ans: ( d ) is of a very poor standard.

5. The word ?assessment? means
(a) enquiry
(b) report
(c) evaluation
(d) summary
Ans: ( c ) evaluation

PASSAGE ? 8
Speech is a great blessing but it can also be a great
curse, for while it helps us to make our intentions and
desires known to our fellows, it can also, if we use it
carelessly, make our attitude completely misunderstood. A
slip of the tongue, the use of an unusual word, or of an
ambiguous word, and so on, may create an enemy where we had
hoped to win a friend. Again, different classes of people
use different vocabularies, and the ordinary speech of an
educated man may strike an uneducated listener as pompous.
Unwittingly, we may use a word which bears a different
meaning to our listener from what is does to men of our own
class. Thus speech is not a gift to use lightly without
thought, but one which demands careful handling. Only a
fool will express himself alike to all kinds and conditions
of men.
1. Speech can be a curse, because it can
(a) hurt others.
(b) lead to careleassness.
(c) create misunderstanding.
(d) reveal our intentions
Ans: ( c ) create misunderstanding.

2. A ?slip of the tongue? means something said
(a) wrongly by change.
(b) unintentionally.
(c) without giving proper thought.
(d) to hurt another person.
Ans: ( c ) without giving proper thought.

3. While talking to an uneducated person, we should use
(a) ordinary speech.
(b) his vocabulary.
(c) simple words.
(d) polite language.
Ans: ( b ) his vocabulary.

4. If one used the same style of language with
everyone, one would sound
(a) flat
(b) boring
(c) foolish
(d) democratic
Ans: ( c ) foolish

5. The best way to win a friend is to avoid
(a) irony in speech.
(b) pomposity in speech.
(c) verbosity in speech.
(d) ambiguity in speech.
Ans: ( d ) ambiguity in speech.

PASSAGE ? 9
Mahatma Gandhi believed that industrialization was no
answer to the problems that plague the mass of India?s poor
and that villagers should be taught to be self-sufficient
in food, weave their own cloth from cotton and eschew the
glittering prizes that the twentieth century so temptingly
offers. Such an idyllic and rural paradise did not appear
to those who inherited the reins of political power.
1. Which one of the following best illustrates the
relationship between the phrases;
(i) ?eschew the glittering prizes? and
(ii) ?idyllic and rural paradise??
(a) Unless you do (i), you cannot have (ii)
(b) (i) and (ii) are identical in meaning
(c) First of all you must have (ii) in order to
do (i)
(d) The meaning of (i) is directly opposite to
(ii)
Ans: ( d ) The meaning of (i) is directly
opposite to (ii)

2. Mahatma Gandhi?s views opposed industrialization of
villages because
(a) it would help the poor and not the rich.
(b) it would take away the skill of the
villagers.
(c) it would affect the culture of the Indians.
(d) it would undermine self-sufficiency and
destroy the beauty of life of the villager.
Ans: ( b ) it would take away the skill of the
villagers.

3. The meaning of ?the glittering prizes that the
twentieth century so temptingly offers? is
(a) pursuit of a commercialised material
culture.
(b) replacement of rural by urban interests.
(c) complete removal of poverty.
(d) absence of violence and corruption.
Ans: ( c ) complete removal of poverty.

4. Mahatma Gandhi?s dream of ?an idyllic and rural
paradise? was not shared by
(a) those who did not believe in the
industrialization of the country.
(b) those who called him the Father of the
Nation.
(c) those who inherited political power after
independence.
(d) those who believed that villages should be
self-sufficient in food and cloth.
Ans: ( a ) those who did not believe in the
industrialization of the country.

5. The basis of ?an idyllic and rural paradise? is
(a) rapid industrialization of villages.
(b) self-sufficiency in food and clothes and
simplicity of the lifestyle.
(c) bringing to the villages the glittering
prizes of the twentieth century.
(d) supporting those holding powerful political
positions.
Ans: ( b ) self-sufficiency in food and
clothes and simplicity of the lifestyle.

PASSAGE ? 10
Organisations are institutions in which members
compete for status and power. They compete for the
resources of the organization, for example, finance to
expand their own departments, for career advancement and
for power to control the activities of others. In pursuit
of these aims, groups are formed and sectional interests
emerge. As a result, policy decisions may serve the ends
of the political and career systems rather than those of
the concern. In this way, the goals of the organization
may be displaced in favour of sectional interests and
individual ambition. These preoccupations sometimes
prevent the emergence of organic systems. Many of the
electronics firms in their study had recently created
research and development departments employing highly
qualified and well-paid scientists and technicians. Their
high pay and expert knowledge were sometimes seen as a
threat to the established order of rank, power and
privilege. Many senior managers had little knowledge of
the technicalities and possibilities of new developments
and electronics. Some felt that close cooperation with the
experts in an organic system would reveal their ignorance
and show that their experience was now redundant.
1. The author makes out a case for
(a) organic system.
(b) research and development in organizations.
(c) an understanding between senior and middle
level executives.
(d) a refresher course for senior managers.
Ans: ( a ) organic system.

2. The theme of the passage is
(a) groupism in organizations.
(b) individual ambitions in organizations.
(c) frustration of senior managers.
(d) emergence of sectional interests in
organizations.
Ans: ( d ) emergence of sectional interests in
organizations.

3. Policy decision in organization would involve
(a) cooperation at all levels in the
organization.
(b) modernization of the organization.
(c) attracting highly qualified personnel.
(d) keeping in view the larger objectives of
the organization.
Ans: ( c ) attracting highly qualified
personnel.

4. ?Organic system? as related to the organization
implies its
(a) growth with the help of export knowledge.
(b) growth with inputs from science and
technology.
(c) steady all-round development.
(d) natural and unimpeded growth.
Ans: ( b ) growth with inputs from science and
technology.

5. The author tends to see the senior managers as
(a) ignorant and incompetent.
(b) a little out of step with their work
environment.
(c) jealous of their younger colleagues.
(d) robbed of their rank, power and privilege
Ans: ( a ) ignorant and incompetent.

PASSAGE ? 11
Corduroy is fast establishing itself as this year?s
fabric. While the ribbed cotton itself provides
utilitarian tenacity, texture and warmth, it is the
fabric?s long-held associations that may provide a hint to
its current revival as a fabric for all seasons.
It is corduroy?s link with good breeding and
country living that made it an essential ingredient in the
gentleman?s wardrobe along with Wellington boots and a
decent woolly. It combines the comfortable nonsense appeal
of cotton with the perfectly correct luxury finish of
velvet. Corduroy has the ability to appear either
supremely sophisticated or rough and ready.
1. Which one of the following best describes the
passage?
(a) It tells us about the usefulness of
corduroy.
(b) It talks about the virtues of corduroy.
(c) It persuades us to buy corduroy.
(d) It makes us understand the everlasting
appeal of corduroy to the young.
Ans: ( b ) It talks about the virtues of
corduroy.

2. According to the author, the special quality of
corduroy is that
(a) it needs no ironing.
(b) it combines the virtues of both cotton and
velvet.
(c) it contains the correct mixture of cotton
and velvet.
(d) both the rich and that not-so-rich can
afford to buy it.
Ans: ( d ) both the rich and that not-so-rich
can afford to buy it.

3. According to the passage, corduroy is essential in
a gentleman?s wardrobe because
(a) it goes with Wellington boots.
(b) its current revival gives a taste of the
latest fashion.
(c) it has its associations with good
upbringing and a conservative lifestyle.
(d) it can be an idea alternative to woolen
clothes.
Ans: ( c ) it has its associations with good
upbringing and a conservative lifestyle.

4. When the writer refers to corduroy?s ?utilitarian
tenacity? he means that
(a) though expensive, it is economic in the
long-run.
(b) it is useful because it is durable.
(c) it has remained fashionable over several
years.
(d) it does not need frequent washing.
Ans: ( b ) it is useful because it is durable.

5. Corduroy is a fabric for all seasons because
(a) it can be worn not only in winter but also
in summer.
(b) of its peculiar texture and warmth.
(c) it is made popular by catchy advertisements.
(d) gentlemen can wear it on both formal and
informal occasions.
Ans: ( a ) it can be worn not only in winter
but also in summer.

PASSAGE ? 12
The enjoyment of physical possession of things
would seem to be one of the prerogatives of wealth which
has been little impaired. Presumably nothing has happened
to keep the man who can afford them from enjoying his
Rembrandts and his homegrown orchids. But enjoyment of
things has always been associated with the third
prerogative of wealth which is the distinction it confers.
In a world where nearly everyone was poor, this distinction
was very great. It was the natural consequence of rarity.
In England. It is widely agreed, the ducal families are
not uniformly superior. There is a roughly normal
incidence of intelligence and stupidity, good taste and bad
taste, morality, immorality, homosexuality and incest. But
very few people are dukes and duchesses, although the
latter have become rather more frequent with the
modernising of the divorce laws. As a result, even though
they may be intrinsically unexceptional, they are regarded
with some awe. So it has long been with the rich. Were
dukes numerous, their position would deteriorate. As the
rich have become more numerous, they have inevitably become
a debased currency.
1. Among the ducal families
(a) there is a great deal of immorality.
(b) there is a fairly even spread of virtues
and vices.
(c) There is a great deal of bad taste.
(d) There is either great intelligence or great
stupidity.
Ans: ( b ) there is a fairly even spread of
virtues and vices.

2. There are more duchesses now because
(a) it is easier for dukes to divorce and
remarry
(b) dukes tare more immoral than they used to be
(c) their position has deteriorated
(d) they are debased
Ans: ( a ) it is easier for dukes to divorce
and remarry

3. The enjoyment of the physical possession of things
(a) is one of the privileges of wealth which
has not been changed
(b) is one of the privileges of wealth which
should be curtailed
(c) has little to do with the prerogatives of
wealth
(d) is a prerogative of wealth which cannot be
disputed
Ans: ( a ) is one of the privileges of wealth
which has not been changed

4. The distinction conferred by wealth
(a) was unfair to the poor
(b) was unlikely to spread throughout the world
(c) was very great when there were many rich
people
(d) was very great when there were few rich
people.
Ans: ( d ) was very great when there were few
rich people.

5. Ducal families in England
(a) are generally agreed to be fairly common
(b) are generally agreed to be superior
(c) are superior because they are rich
(d) are generally agreed not to be always
better than others.
Ans: ( d ) are generally agreed not to be
always better than others.

PASSAGE ? 13
Nehru?s was a many-sided personality. He enjoyed
reading and writing books as much as he enjoyed fighting
political and social evils or resisting tyranny. In him,
the scientist and the humanist were held in perfect
balance. While he kept looking at special problems from a
scientific standpoint, he never forget that we should
nourish the total man. As a scientist, he refused to
believe in a benevolent power interested in men?s affairs,
but, as a self-proclaimed non-believer, he loved affirming
his faith in life and the beauty of nature. Children he
adored. Unlike Wordsworth, he did not see them trailing
clouds of glory from their recent sojourn in heaven. He
saw them as blossoms of promise and renewal, the only hope
for mankind.
1. A ?many-side personality? means
(a) a complex personality
(b) a secretive person
(c) a person having varied interests
(d) a capable person
Ans: ( c ) a person having varied interests

2. Nehru enjoyed
(a) reading and writing books
(b) fighting political and social evils
(c) resisting tyranny
(d) doing all the above and much more
Ans: ( d ) doing all the above and much more

3. Nehru thought that children.
(a) were trailing clouds of glory.
(b) held promise for a better future.
(c) were like flowers to be loved and admired.
(d) held no hope for mankind.
Ans: ( b ) held promise for a better future.

4. Which of the following statements reflects Nehru?s
point of view?
(a) Humanism is more important than science
(b) Science is supreme and humanism is
subordinate to it
(c) Science and humanism are equally important
(d) There is no common ground between science
and humanism
Ans: ( c ) Science and humanism are equally
important

5. In this passage, ?a benevolent power interested in
men?s affairs? means
(a) a supernatural power of God
(b) beauty of nature
(c) the spirit of science
(d) the total man
Ans: ( a ) a supernatural power of God

PASSAGE ? 14
Until the end of his first year at school, Cyril
retained many of the pleasures and pursuits he had brought
with him from home, and he kept an old interest in
butterflies and fossils. His grandmother had presented him
with a fine birds? eggs cabinet, but he could never bring
himself to risks in climbing trees. Once or twice he
dissected dead birds from sheer determination to overcome
his horror of the operation. Probably it was his envy of
those physically unlike himself that brought on a phase
during which he drew massive athletes with thick necks and
square shoulders. Again he was pitying himself for what he
could never be.
1. Until the end of the first year, Cyril retained his
interest in
(a) bird's eggs
(b) butterflies and fossils
(c) dissecting birds
(d) drawing pictures of athletes
Ans: ( b ) butterflies and fossils

2. Cyril?s early schooling was in some ways like home
life because
(a) he had all his old friends with him
(b) the food and the climate were the same as
at home
(c) he kept on doing what gave joy and
recreation at home
(d) His family visited him often
Ans: ( c ) he kept on doing what gave joy and
recreation at home

3. Cyril did NOT want to climb trees because he
(a) loved to play on the ground
(b) was scared of falling down
(c) disliked trees
(d) thought it was childish
Ans: ( b ) was scared of falling down

4. Cyril dissected dead birds to
(a) see if he would like to become a doctor
(b) Please his grandmother
(c) satisfy his curiosity
(d) overcome the fear of the act
Ans: ( d ) overcome the fear of the act

5. The reason why Cyril made drawings of athletes was
that
(a) though he admired them, he lacked a fine
physique himself
(b) he loved violent exercises
(c) athletics was a passion with him
(d) he had to complete an assignment
Ans: ( a ) though he admired them, he lacked a
fine physique himself

PASSAGE ? 15
The assault on the purity of the environment is the
price that we pay for many of the benefits of modern
technology. For the advantages of automotive
transportation we pay a price in smog-induced diseases; for
the powerful effects of new insecticides, we pay a price in
dwindling wildlife and disturbances in the relation of
living things and their surroundings; for nuclear power, we
risk the biological hazards of radiation. By increasing
agricultural production with fertilizers, we worsen water
pollution.
The highly developed nations of the world are not
only the immediate beneficiaries of the good that
technology can do, they are also the first victims of the
environmental diseases that technology breeds. In the
past, the environmental effects which accompanied
technological progress were restricted to a small place and
relatively short time. The new hazards are neither local
nor brief. Modern air pollution covers vast areas of the
continents: Radioactive fallout from nuclear explosions is
worldwide. Radioactive pollutions now on the Earth?s
surface will be found there for generations, and in the
case of Carbon-14, for thousands of years.
1. The passage emphasizes that modern technology
(a) is an unmixed blessing
(b) has caused serious hazards to life
(c) has produced powerful chemicals
(d) has benefited highly developed nations
Ans: ( b ) has caused serious hazards to life

2. According to the passage the increasing use of
fertilizers is responsible for
(a) abundance of food
(b) disturbance in the ecological system
(c) water pollution
(d) increase in diseases
Ans: ( c ) water pollution

3. The widespread use of insecticides has
(a) reduced the number of wild animals
(b) caused imbalance in the relation between
living beings and their environment
(c) eliminated diseases by killing mosquitoes
and flies
(d) caused biological hazards
Ans: ( b ) caused imbalance in the relation
between living beings and their environment

4. Radioactive pollutants
(a) are limited in their effect
(b) will infest the atmosphere for thousands of
years
(c) will be on the surface of the earth for a
very long time
(d) will dissipate in a short span of time
Ans: ( c ) will be on the surface of the earth
for a very long time

5. The harmful effects of modern technology are
(a) widespread but short-lived
(b) widespread and long-lasting
(c) limited and long-lasting
(d) severe but short-lived
Ans: ( b ) widespread and long-lasting

PASSAGE ? 16
There was a marked difference of quality between
the personages who haunted the near bridge of brick and the
personages who haunted the far one of stone. Those of
lowest character preferred the former, adjoining the town:
they did not mind the glare of the public eye. They had
been of no account during their successes; and though they
might feel dispirited, they had no sense of shame in their
ruin. Instead of sighing at their adversaries they spat
and instead of saying the iron had entered into their souls
they said they were down in their luck. The miserables who
would pause on the remoter bridge were of a politer stamp-
persons who did not know how to get rid of the weary time.
The eyes of this species were mostly directed over the
parapet upon the running water below. While one on the
townward bridge did not mind who saw him so, and kept his
back to the parapet to survey the passer-by, one on this
never faced the road, never turned his head at coming foot-
steps, but, sensitive on his own condition, watched the
current whenever a stranger approached, as if some strange
fish interested him, though every finned thing had been
poached out of the river years before.
1. In this passage, the author is trying to
(a) explain the difference between the
construction of the two bridges.
(b) describe the way different sections of
people like to dress.
(c) explain the variety of ways in which
strangers can be treated.
(d) describe how people of different classes
behaved when unhappy.
Ans: ( d ) describe how people of different
classes behaved when unhappy.

2. People belonging to the lower strata in their
moments of distress
(a) remembered their days of glory.
(b) dressed shabbily to earn sympathy.
(c) visited the brick-made bridge.
(d) felt ashamed of their failures.
Ans: ( c ) visited the brick-made bridge.

3. The bridge of stone was frequented by
(a) all the sections of society
(b) those fond of fishing
(c) the sophisticated buluckness
(d) none of the above
Ans: ( c ) the sophisticated buluckness

4. The two bridges were known
(a) for their similar design.
(b) for being equidistant from town.
(c) for being haunted places.
(d) for attracting dejected people to them.
Ans: ( d ) for attracting dejected people to
them.

5. The attitude of the lowly and genteel towards
strangers was
(a) virtually the same
(b) entirely different
(c) completely indifferent
(d) virulently hostile
Ans: ( b ) entirely different

PASSAGE ? 17
Nationalism, of course, is a curious phenomenon
which at a certain stage in a country?s history gives life,
growth and unity but, at the same time, it has a tendency
to limit one, because one thinks of one?s country as
something different from the rest of the world. One?s
perspective changes and one is continuously thinking of
one?s own struggles and virtues and failing to the
exclusion of other thoughts. The result is that the same
nationalism which is the symbol of growth for a people
becomes a symbol of the cessation of that growth in the
mind. Nationalism, when it becomes successful, sometimes
goes on spreading in an aggressive way and becomes a danger
internationally. Whatever line of thought you follow, you
arrive at the conclusion that some kind of balance must be
found. Otherwise something that was good can turn into
evil. Culture, which is essentially good becomes not only
static but aggressive and something that breeds conflict
and hatred when looked at from a wrong point of view. How
are you to find a balance, I don?t know. Apart from the
political and economic problems of the age, perhaps that is
the greatest problem today because behind it there is a
tremendous search for something which it cannot find. We
turn to economic theories because they have an undoubted
importance. It is folly to talk of culture or even of God
when human beings starve and die. Before one can talk
about anything else one must provide the normal essentials
of life to human beings. That is where economics comes
in. human beings today are not in the mood to tolerate
this suffering and starvation and inequality when they see
that the burden is not equally shared. Others profit while
they only bear the burden.
1. Aggressive nationalism
(a) breeds threat to international relations
(b) leads to stunted growth
(c) endangers national unity
(d) isolates a country
Ans: ( d ) isolates a country

2. Suitable title for this passage can be
(a) Nationalism breeds unity
(b) Nationalism ? a road to world unity
(c) Nationalism is not enough
(d) Nationalism and national problems
Ans: ( c ) Nationalism is not enough

3. ?Other?s in the last sentence refers to
(a) other people
(b) other nations
(c) other communities
(d) other neighbours
Ans: ( a ) other people

4. Negative national feeling can make a nation
(a) selfish
(b) self-centred
(c) indifferent
(d) dangerous
Ans: ( b ) self-centred

5. The greatest problem? in the middle of the passage
refers to the question
(a) how to mitigate hardship to human beings
(b) how to contain the dangers of aggressive
nationalism
(c) how to share the economic burden equally
(d) how to curb international hatred
Ans: ( b ) how to contain the dangers of
aggressive nationalism

PASSAGE ? 18
Detective stories tend to glorify crime.
Murderers, gangsters and crooks of all kinds are described
as tough, cunning and courageous individuals who know how
to take care of themselves and how to get what they want.
In James McCain?s The Postman Always Rings Twice, for
instance, the villain is a much more impressive character
than his victim. He is casual, brave smart and successful
with women. It is true that he finally gets caught. But
he is punished for a crime that he did not commit, so that
his conviction is hardly a triumph of justice. Besides,
looking back over the exciting life of the criminal, the
reader might conclude that it was worth the risk.
1. According to the passage given above, detective
stories
(a) make interesting reading
(b) are hardly worth reading
(c) encourage readers to commit crimes
(d) tend to create wrong notions about crimes
and punishment
Ans: ( d ) tend to create wrong notions about
crimes and punishment

2. Murderers, gangsters and crooks referred to in the
passage given above
(a) always manage to get away
(b) are often glorified in detective stories
(c) are wiser than their victims
(d) know how to escape from law
Ans: ( b ) are often glorified in detective
stories

3. According to the passage, the life of a criminal
(a) is exciting
(b) is hardly worth the risk
(c) is seldom presented in the right perspective
(d) ends in a triumph of justice
Ans: ( c ) is seldom presented in the right
perspective

4. The passage mentions James McCain.
(a) as an author of a detective story
(b) as brave, smart and successful with women
(c) as tough cunning and courageous
(d) as being more impressive than others
Ans: ( a ) as an author of a detective story

5. According to this passage, a criminal in a
detective story generally gets caught
(a) for the crimes he has committed
(b) because of his careless mistakes
(c) because the police is smarter than the
criminals
(d) for the crimes he has not committed
Ans: ( d ) for the crimes he has not committed

PASSAGE ? 19
There is more than modicum of truth in the
assertion that ?a working knowledge of ancient history is
necessary to the intelligent interpretation of current
events?. But the sage who uttered these words of wisdom
might well have added something on the benefits of
studying, particularly, the famous battles of history for
the lessons they contain for those of us who lead or aspire
to leadership. Such a study will reveal certain qualities
and attributes which enabled the winners to win?and certain
deficiencies which caused the losers to lose. And the
student will see that the same pattern recurs consistently,
again and again, throughout the centuries.
1. The expression ?more than a modicum of truth? means
(a) some truth
(b) much truth
(c) more than a small amount of truth
(d) nothing but truth
Ans: ( c ) more than a small amount of truth

2. In this context, ?intelligent interpretation of
current events? means
(a) rational explanation of vents.
(b) appropriate understanding of events.
(c) intellectual outlook on events.
(d) skilful interpretation of events.
Ans: ( a ) rational explanation of vents.

3. According to the writer, a study of the famous
battles of history would
(a) be beneficial to wise men
(b) provide food to modern leaders for
reflection
(c) be more useful than a general knowledge of
ancient history
(d) help us understand the art of modern
warfare.
Ans: ( b ) provide food to modern leaders for
reflection

4. A knowledge of history is necessary to interpret
current problems because.
(a) they have roots in the past.
(b) they can be contrasted with the past events.
(c) they may be repetitions of past events.
(d) only then they can be put in a proper
context.
Ans: ( c ) they may be repetitions of past
events.

5. A person who aspires to lead could learn from the
history of battles
(a) what led the previous leaders win a battle.
(b) what made them lose a battle.
(c) the qualities and deficiencies of
commanders of these battles.
(d) the strategies that they have evolved in
course of these battles.
Ans: ( c ) the qualities and deficiencies of
commanders of these battles.

PASSAGE ? 20
The casual horrors and the real disasters are
thrown at newspaper readers without discrimination. In the
contemporary arrangements for circulating the news, an
important element, evaluation, is always weak and often
wanting entirely. There is no point anywhere along the
line where someone puts his foot down for certain and
says, ?This is important and that doesn?t amount to a row
of beans; deserves no one?s attention, and should travel
the wires no farther?. The junk is dressed up to look as
meaningful as the real news.
1. The writer of the above passage
(a) seems to be happy with the contemporary
arrangements fro circulating news
(b) is shocked by the casual stories about
horrors and disasters reported in the newspapers
(c) wants better evaluation of news before
publication
(d) wants to put his foot down on news stories
Ans: ( c ) wants better evaluation of news
before publication

2. Newspapers lack a sense of discrimination because
(a) they do not separate the real news from
mere sensationalism
(b) they have to accept whatever is received on
the wires
(c) limited manpower makes serious evaluation
impossible
(d) people don?t see the difference
between ?junk? and ?real? news
Ans: ( a ) they do not separate the real news
from mere sensationalism

3. The passage implies that
(a) there has to be censorship on newspapers
(b) there is no point in having censorship
(c) newspapers always dress up junk to look
meaningful
(d) one has to be strict in selecting news items
Ans: ( c ) newspapers always dress up junk to
look meaningful

4. Evaluation of news would imply
(a) less dependence on modern systems of
communication
(b) more careful analysis of each news story
and its value
(c) separating beans from junk
(d) discriminating horrors from disasters
Ans: ( b ) more careful analysis of each news
story and its value

5. In the above passage, the phrase ?amounts to a row
of beans? means that the news
(a) is weak and often wanting entirely
(b) deserves no one?s attention
(c) should travel the wires
(d) is junk dressed up as real news
Ans: ( b ) deserves no one?s attention

PASSAGE ? 21
The world dismisses curiosity by calling it idle or
mere idle curiosity?even though curious persons are seldom
idle. Parents do their best to extinguish curiosity in
their children because it makes life difficult to be faced
everyday with a string of unanswerable questions about what
makes fire hot or why grass grows. Children whose
curiosity survives parental discipline are invited to join
our university. With the university, they go on asking
their questions and trying to find the answers. In the
eyes of a scholar, that is what a university is for. Some
of the questions which the scholars ask seem to the world
to be scarcely worth asking, let alone answering. They
asked questions too minute and specialized for you and me
to understand without years of explanation. If the world
inquires of one of them why he wants to know the answer to
a particular question he may say especially if he is a
scientist, that the answer will in some obscure way make
possible a new machine or weapon or gadget. He talks that
way because he knows that the world understands and
respects utility.
But to you who are now part of the university, he
will say that he wants to know the answer simply because he
does not know it, the way the mountain climber wants to
climb a mountain, simply because it is there. Similarly a
historian asked by an outsider why he studies history may
come out with the argument that he has learnt to repeat on
such occasions, something about knowledge of the past
making it possible to understand the present and mould the
future. But if you really want to know why a historian
studies the past, the answer is much simpler, something
happened and he would like to know what. All this does not
mean that the answers which scholars find to their
questions have no consequences. They may have enormous
consequences but these seldom form the reason for asking
the question or pursuing the answers. It is true that
scholars can be put to work answering questions for the
sake of the consequences as thousands are working now, for
example, in search of a cure for cancer. But this is not
the primary function of the scholars. For the consequences
are usually subordinate to the satisfaction of curiosity.
1. The common people consider some of the questions
that the scholars ask unimportant
(a) as they are too lazy and idle
(b) as they are too modest
(c) as it?s beyond their comprehension
(d) as it is considered a waste of time
Ans: ( c ) as it?s beyond their comprehension

2. A historian really studies the past
(a) to comprehend the present and to
reconstruct the future
(b) to explain the present and plan the future
(c) to understand the present and make fortune
(d) to understand the present and mould the
future
Ans: ( d ) to understand the present and mould
the future

3. Children whose curiosity survives parental
discipline means
(a) children retaining their curiosity in spite
of being discouraged by their parents
(b) children pursuing their mental curiosity
(c) children?s curiosity subdued due to
parents? intervention
(d) children being disciplined by their parents
Ans: ( a ) children retaining their curiosity
in spite of being discouraged by their parents

4. According to the passage, parents do their best to
discourage curiosity in their children
(a) because they have no time
(b) because they have no patience to answer them
(c) because they feel that their children ask
stupid questions continuously
(d) because they are unable to answer all their
questions
Ans: ( d ) because they are unable to answer
all their questions

5. According to the passage, the children make life
difficult for their parents
(a) by their ceaseless curiosity
(b) by unceasing bombardment of questions
(c) by asking irrelevant questions
(d) by posing profound questions
Ans: ( a ) by their ceaseless curiosity

PASSAGE ? 22
He saw nothing, he had no knife or sharp
instrument, the grating of the window was of iron and he
had too often assured himself of its solidity. His
furniture consisted of a bed, a chair, a table, a pail and
a jug. The bed had iron clamps, but they were screwed to
the wall and it would have required a screwdriver to take
them off.
Dantes had but one resource which was to break the
jug and with one of the sharp fragments attack the wall.
He let the jug fall on the floor and it broke in pieces.
He concealed two or three of the sharpest fragments in his
bed, leaving the rest on the floor. The braking of the jug
was too natural an accident to excise suspicion, and next
morning the gaoler went grumblingly to fetch another,
without giving himself the trouble to remove the
fragments. Dantes head joyfully the key grate in the lock
as the guard departed.
1. Dantes probably broke the jug
(a) in the morning
(b) during the night
(c) after breakfast
(d) at exactly 3 p.m.
Ans: ( b ) during the night

2. The guard left the fragments because he
(a) didn?t notice them
(b) wished to punish Dantes
(c) was too lazy to bother
(d) wanted Dantes to clear up
Ans: ( c ) was too lazy to bother

3. Dantes heard the key grate in the lock when the
(a) cell door was shut
(b) cell door was opened
(c) storeroom was opened
(d) storeroom was shut
Ans: ( d ) storeroom was shut

4. Dantes was in
(a) a hostel
(b) a dining room
(c) an army barracks
(d) a prison
Ans: ( d ) a prison

5. Dantes was planning to
(a) carve his name
(b) make his escape
(c) tease the guard
(d) call for breakfast
Ans: ( b ) make his escape

PASSAGE ? 23
The greatest thing this age can be proud of is the
birth of Man in the consciousness of men. In his drunken
orgies of power and national pride man may flout and jeer
at it. When organized national selfishness, racial
antipathy and commercial self-seeking begin to display
their ugly deformities in all their nakedness, then comes
the time for man to know that his salvation is not in
political organizations and extended trade relations, not
in any mechanical re-arrangement of social system but in a
deeper transformation of life, in the liberation of
consciousness in love, in the realization of God in man.
1. According to the author, ?salvation? of human
beings lies in the
(a) extended trade relations.
(b) spiritual transformation of life.
(c) orgy of national pride.
(d) wholehearted participation in political
organizations.
Ans: ( b ) spiritual transformation of life.

2. In the phrase ?the birth of Man in the
consciousness of men?, Man stands for
(a) power and arrogance
(b) egocentricity
(c) noble human qualities
(d) an idealistic notion of the human self
Ans: ( d ) an idealistic notion of the human
self

3. The author uses the expression ?ugly deformities?
to show his indignation at
(a) political organizations
(b) the liberation of human consciousness
(c) selfishness and materialism of the people
(d) the drunken orgies of power
Ans: ( c ) selfishness and materialism of the
people

4. People jeer at the ?birth of Man? in the human
consciousness when they
(a) begin to think of themselves as God
(b) become power-hungry
(c) restructure the social system
(d) become mentally deranged
Ans: ( b ) become power-hungry

5. In this passage, the phrase ?God in man? implies
(a) God having assumed the shape of man
(b) neither fully godly nor fully human
(c) man being transformed into God
(d) the divine qualities in man
Ans: ( d ) the divine qualities in man

PASSAGE ? 24
Modern economics does not differentiate between
renewable and non-renewable materials, as its method is to
measure everything by means of a money price. Thus, taking
various alternative fuels, like coal, oil, wood or water
power; the only difference between them recognised by
modern economics is relative cost per equivalent unit. The
cheapest is automatically the one to be preferred, as to do
otherwise would be irrational and ?uneconomic?. From a
Buddhist point of view, of course this will not do, the
essential difference between non-renewable fuels likes coal
and oil on the one hand and renewable fuels like wood and
water-power on the other cannot be simply overlooked. Non-
renewable goods must be used only if they are
indispensable, and then only with the greatest care and the
highest concern for conservation. To use them carelessly
or extravagantly is an act of violence, and while complete
non-violence may not be possible on this earth, it is
nonetheless the duty of man to aim at the ideal of non-
violence in all he does.
1. The Buddhist economist?s attitude implies that
fuels like coal and oil must be used only if
(a) there is a plentiful supply
(b) wood and water-power can be dispensed with
(c) the relative cost of each is than that of
wood and water
(d) there is no alternative fuel available
Ans: ( d ) there is no alternative fuel
available

2. According to the passage, Buddhish economists are
not in favour of
(a) measuring everything in terms of money
(b) using non-renewable sources
(c) economic development
(d) applying non-violence to every sphere of
life
Ans: ( b ) using non-renewable sources

3. In this passage the author is trying to
(a) differentiate between renewable and non-
renewable materials
(b) show that the modern economist is concerned
only with costs
(c) underline the need for conserving natural
resources
(d) differentiate between two economic
philosophies
Ans: ( d ) differentiate between two economic
philosophies

4. Which of the following statements may be assumed to
be false from the information in the passage?
1. The writer finds the attitude of modern economists
towards natural resources to be uneconomic
2. Buddhist economists are indifferent to the cost of
fuels
3. To use oil on non-essentials is contrary to the
Buddhist economic philosophy
4. To feel a tree is an act of violence not permitted
by Buddhist economists
of the above statements
(a) 1 and 2 are false
(b) 1, 2 and 4 are false
(c) 3 and 4 are false
(d) All 1, 2, 3 and 4 are false
Ans: ( b ) 1, 2 and 4 are false

5. Fill in the blanks with the appropriate pair of
phrases:
The passage suggests that while a modern economist,
considers it uneconomical to use?? form of fuel, a Buddhist
economist considers it uneconomical to use ?? form a fuel
(a) a cheap, a renewable
(b) an irrational, an essential
(c) an expensive, an unrenew-able
(d) a rational, an unessential
Ans: ( c ) an expensive, an unrenew-able

PASSAGE ? 25
Sometimes we went off the road and on a path
through the pine forest. The floor of the forest was soft
to walk on; the frost did not harden it as it did the
road. But we did not mind the hardness of the road because
we had nails in the soles and heels of our boots and the
heel nails bit on the frozen ruts and with nailed boots it
was good walking on the road and invigorating. It was
lovely walking in the woods.
1. Sometimes we walked through the pine forest as
(a) the path was unaffected by the frost
(b) It was good walking with nails in the boots
(c) the walk was invigorating
(d) it was sheer joy to walk in the forest
Ans: ( a ) the path was unaffected by the frost

2. The floor of the forest was soft because
(a) the frost did not harden it on account of
trees
(b) the travelers were wearing boots
(c) the shoes had nails on their sole and heel
(d) they enjoyed walking in the woods
Ans: ( a ) the frost did not harden it on
account of trees

3. We did not mind the hardness of the road because
(a) we had nailed boots on
(b) it was good walking on the road
(c) the walk was refreshing
(d) the nails bit on the frozen roads
Ans: ( a ) we had nailed boots on

4. ?Frozen ruts? means
(a) very cold roads
(b) wheel marks in which frost had become hard
(c) the road covered with frost
(d) hard roads covered with snow
Ans: ( c ) the road covered with frost

5. We found great joy on account of
(a) wearing nailed boots
(b) the good long walk on the road
(c) walking occasionally through the forest
(d) walking on frost with nailed boots on
Ans: ( d ) walking on frost with nailed boots
on

PASSAGE ? 26
Many Sociologists have argued that there is a
functional relationship between education and economic
system. They point to the fact that mass formal education
began in industrial society and is an established part of
all industrial societies. They note that the expansion of
the economics of industrial societies is accompanied by a
corresponding expansion of their educational systems. They
explain this correspondence in terms of the needs of
industry for skilled and trained man-power, needs which are
met by the educational system. Thus, the provision of mass
elementary education in Britain in 1870 can be seen as a
response to the needs of industry for a literate and
numerate work-force at a time when industrial processes
were becoming more complex and the demand for technical
skills was steadily growing.
1. The Sociologists referred to in the passage say
that the relationship between industry and elementary
education was one
(a) based on mutual need.
(b) based entirely on the need of the industry.
(c) based entirely on economic need.
(d) based on some inexplicable historical
forces.
Ans: ( b ) based entirely on the need of the
industry.

2. The author argues that
(a) formal education can be traced to
industrial society.
(b) industrial society is responsible for
expansion of education at the mass level.
(c) industrial society gave rise to vocational
education.
(d) industrial society changed the pattern of
education.
Ans: ( a ) formal education can be traced to
industrial society.

3. By ?functional relationship? is meant
(a) a short-term relationship.
(b) Practical and utilitarian relationship.
(c) temporary arrangement.
(d) close and unbreakable relationship.
Ans: ( b ) Practical and utilitarian
relationship.

4. The observations of the Sociologists are based on a
study of
(a) the statistical data available in a
historical context.
(b) economic system of the 19th century.
(c) the correlation between industry and
education in a historical context.
(d) growth of industry in the 19th century.
Ans: ( d ) growth of industry in the 19th
century.

5. The industry needs a literate work-force because
(a) its expansion needs sound learning
(b) it relies heavily on expertise.
(c) it promotes a competitive spirit.
(d) its operations need intricate technical
knowledge.
Ans: ( d ) its operations need intricate
technical knowledge.

PASSAGE ? 27
The Indian Middle Class consists of so many strata
that it defies categorization under a single term class,
which would imply a considerable degree of homogeneity.
Yet two paradoxical features characterize its conduct
fairly uniformly: extensive practice and intensive
abhorrence of corruption.
In the several recent surveys of popular
perceptions of corruption, politicians of course invariably
and understandably top the list, closely followed by
bureaucrats, policemen, lawyers, businessmen and others?the
quintessential middle class. If teachers do not figure
high on this priority list. It is not for lack of trying,
but for lack of opportunities. Over the years, the sense
or shock over acts of corruption in the middle class has
witnessed a stead de-cline, as its ambitions for a better
material life have soared but the resources for meeting
such ambitions have not kept pace.
What is fascinating, however, is the intense
yearning of this class for a clean corruptionless polity
and society, a yearning that has again and again surfaced
with any figure public or obscure, focusing on his mission
of eradicating corruption. Even the repeated failure of
this promise on virtually every man?s part has not
subjected it to the law of diminishing returns.
1. The Indian Middle Class is
(a) defiant
(b) mysterious
(c) homogeneous
(d) stratified
Ans: ( c ) homogeneous

2. Teachers are not high on the list of corruption
because they do not have
(a) courage
(b) opportunities
(c) support
(d) ambition
Ans: ( b ) opportunities

3. This yearning, over the years, has
(a) persisted
(b) soared
(c) declined
(d) disappeared
Ans: ( a ) persisted

4. Who figure on top of the list of corruption?
(a) businessmen
(b) lawyers
(c) politicians
(d) policemen
Ans: ( c ) politicians

5. The Indian Middle Class intensely yearns for
(a) better material resources
(b) extensive practice of corruption
(c) clean honest society
(d) law of increasing returns
Ans: ( c ) clean honest society

PASSAGE ? 28
Piccadilly Circus was full of loneliness. It
seethes and echoes with it. To live near it, looking down
on it, is a discomforting experience. You can?t feel the
pulse of London there, though people expect to. To
Londoners it is a maddening obstruction between one place
and another, and few voluntarily linger there. The only
locals are those who live off the lingerers; the lingerers
are primarily sightseers, with a fair sprinkling of people
hoping to draw attention to themselves?both typically from
the provinces. They have come to see the heart of London
and expect to see spectacle, glamour and vice.
1. The passage implies that
(a) some Londoners love to spend their time
near Piccadilly Circus
(b) no Londoner wants to be in Piccadilly Circus
(c) Piccadilly Circus is a hazardous place
(d) Piccadilly Circus is a place of vice
Ans: ( c ) Piccadilly Circus is a hazardous
place

2. Piccadilly circus is
(a) the name of a circus company
(b) a lonely and resounding old building
(c) a centrally located area in London
(d) a huge heap of ruins
Ans: ( c ) a centrally located area in London

3. The lingerers found in Piccadilly Circus are mainly
(a) the citizens of London
(b) sightseers from provincial areas of Britain
(c) people who want to show off
(d) local idlers
Ans: ( b ) sightseers from provincial areas of
Britain

4. For those who live near Piccadilly Circus, it is
(a) a very noisy place
(b) crowded with people
(c) an obstruction to traffic
(d) an awkward structure
Ans: ( c ) an obstruction to traffic

5. According to this passage, people from outside
London go to Piccadilly Circus because it is
(a) a historical place
(b) full of glamour
(c) full of exciting people
(d) the pulse of London
Ans: ( b ) full of glamour

PASSAGE ? 29
Today perhaps your only association with the
word ?polio? is the Sabin Oral Vaccine that protects
children from the disease. Fifty-five years ago, this was
not so. The dreaded disease, which mainly affects the
brain and the spinal cord, causes stiffening and weakening
of the muscles, crippling and paralysis?which is why I am
in a wheelchair today. If somebody had predicted, when I
was born, that this would happen to me, no one would have
believed it. I was the seventh child in a family of our
pairs of brothers and sisters, with a huge 23-year gap
between the first and the last. I was told that, unlike
the others, I was so fair and brown-haired that I looked
more like a foreigner than a Dawwod Bohri. I was also
considered to be the healthiest of the brood.
1. In this passage, the narrator is a patient of
(a) heart disease
(b) polio
(c) paralysis
(d) nervous weakness
Ans: ( b ) polio

2. The narrator was the seventh child in a family of
(a) 8 children
(b) 16 children
(c) 23 children
(d) 4 children
Ans: ( a ) 8 children

3. In his childhood, the narrator was
(a) a weakling
(b) very healthy
(c) tall and slim
(d) short and stout
Ans: ( b ) very healthy

4. In his childhood, the narrator looked ?more like a
foreigner than a Dawood Bohri?. This was because he was
(a) a foreign child
(b) a very healthy boy
(c) tall and smart
(d) fair and brown-haired
Ans: ( d ) fair and brown-haired

5. In this passage, the word ?brood? refers to
(a) polio victims
(b) foreign children
(c) children in the family
(d) Indian children
Ans: ( c ) children in the family

PASSAGE ? 30
Soft-bodied animals like caterpillars often fall a
prey to voracious hunters like birds or reptiles. Despite
having no means to ?actively? defend themselves, with
weapons like claws or jaws, they have nevertheless, evolved
other equally effective deterrents. A particular species
of the caterpillar lives at an altitude of over 2,500
metres in the Himalayas. It uses prominent colours to
inform would be predators of its inedibility. In the event
that an inexperienced or adventurous bird did eat the
caterpillar, it would probably vomit it out soon after, and
subsequently desist from attacking similar species in the
future. Though this would do the unfortunate victim no
good, the species benefits. A rare example of the martyr
among animals. .
1. Caterpillars cannot defend themselves because they
(a) are passive animals
(b) are lazy
(c) cannot acquire weapons.
(d) have no claws or jaws
Ans: ( d ) have no claws or jaws

2. The Himalayan caterpillar uses prominent colours to
(a) warn the predator.
(b) attack the predator.
(c) reveal itself.
(d) defend itself.
Ans: ( a ) warn the predator.

3. The expression ?others equally effective
deterrents? means
(a) preventive weapons which have equal effect
of others.
(b) mechanism which scares everyone equally
well.
(c) preventive equipment which is as effective
as something that has been already mentioned in the passage.
(d) deterrents that are as powerful as those
the caterpillars have.
Ans: ( b ) mechanism which scares everyone
equally well.
 
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